Frequently Asked Questions

How do I contact MA3?

 

The MA3 Board of Directors is at your service.  If you have any questions you can contact us at MA3Board@gmail.com or click below to email individual board members.

What kind of bow do you use for horseback archery?

 

The brand and type will differ but one thing we have in common is that we don't use a shelf or a rest.  Poundage will differ based on preference and comfort.  The draw weight can vary usually between 30#- 50#.  It is most common to see a horse archers bow weight at 35#.  A couple of starter bow choices are the Samack SKB50 or the Hun Style Bow, prices will be between $170 to $300 for these models, the Attila U Finish Bows runs around $150.  The Saluki Bow is a high end bow used by many serious horse archers, it costs around $900.

What kind of arrows do you use?   

 

This will differ some from person to person based on many variables.  For a number of reasons, most horseback archers use carbon fiber shafts spined to fit the bow, fletched with feathers (lengths will vary) and with a common field tip (weights will vary usually between 75 to 125 grains).  Contact your local archery store for info on prices.

What style of release is used?

 

The majority of mounted shooters worldwide use thumb release, which is thought to be more traditional. There is also the mediterranian or 3 finger release which is more common in ground archery but made popular in horsearchery by Kassai Lajos in Hungary.

What kind of quiver is needed?

 

The most commonly used quiver for this sport is a hip quiver. It is designed to hang from the hip, sometimes attaching to the thigh, on the dominent hand side to retrieve arrows quickly. Other quivers you will find are a back quiver, which is made to strap tightly against your back to eliminate noise and help with control, and a cross draw quiver. The cross draw quiver is a quiver that hangs from your hip on your opposite side from your draw hand, at angle where the nocks are pointed up toward your chest so you may pull across the front of your body.

What breed of horse do you recommend?

 

 It is not a breed that we look for in a good archery horse, but a good disposition is important.  A willing an reliable partner makes the best kind of archery horse.

What kind of saddle do you use?

 

Again this varies from person to person.  As with any equestrian activity the saddle should fit the horse properly, not causing any pain or distraction.  I have seen Western, English jumping and dressage saddles, Australian stock saddles, treeless and other crossbreeds used for the sport.  A breast collar or breastplate is highly recommended as an additional safety precaution, but is not required.

What is a Postal Match?


Horseback archery is growing in popularity all over the world.  Many archers are calling for a way to compete on a regular basis.  One of the problems we face as mounted archers is how to get enough well trained horses together in one place to share in competitions.  To address this issue, we are proposing a "postal match system" in which you may ride your own horse on a course in your area, then tally scores and compare them with other clubs which have set up the same courses with the same stipulations around the world.

 

Each postal match will have courses, styles, targets, dates and rules, set up and agreed upon before hand.  It is imperative that each postal match is set up and run as closely as possible in order for the scores to have meaning.  Once all of the scores from each of the chapters have been tallied, they will then be posted online Internationally.

 

What kind of tack is used?

 

Rules on tack are pretty lax. You may use whatever saddle fits your horse, that you like. Breast collars are preferred. You may ride in a Bozal, Hackamore, bitless bridle or bridle with a bit. Reins are required to be closed or continuous, whether they be circle reins or split reins with a knot in them.  There can be NO halters or Liberty riding or Liberty collars.